The Battle Of the Bulge: Obesity In Pets

British shorthair silver cat lying, looking left up. Whole bodyThe obesity epidemic is no longer just a human problem – obesity in pets is also on the rise. Currently, over half of all pet dogs and cats are considered overweight, and it has become one of the most common conditions our veterinarians see.

Overweight pets face many of the same serious health risks as overweight humans, including heart disease, high blood pressure, joint pain, osteoarthritis, diabetes, and certain cancers. And, as in humans, many of these problems can be helped and managed without medications, by losing the extra pounds and adding some physical activity. Continue…

The Ins and Outs of Anal Sacs

Does your dog regularly scoot its cute backside across the living room floor?

Do you occasionally notice an unpleasant, musky odor in the air or spot a brown streak on the carpet?

Have you noticed your pet obsessively licking its rear end?

If you’ve answered “yes” to any of these questions, your pet’s anal sacs may be to blame.

While not the most exciting topic, knowing what the anal sacs are and how to properly care for them is an important component of your pet’s care.

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How to Keep Your Pet Fit During the Holidays

It probably comes as no surprise that “get healthier” is the most popular New Year’s resolution among Americans. Holiday meals and parties, cookies at the office and at Grandma’s house, and extra treats from friends and neighbors can add up over time, causing a run on gym memberships and diet cookbooks come January 2nd. 

Pets, too, can suffer the ill effects of overindulgence, including the health and mobility consequences that go along with extra weight. Fortunately, it doesn’t have to be difficult to keep your furry friend fit and trim during the holidays.

A little bit of planning, a commitment to your pet’s well being, and the support of your Lone Tree Veterinary Medical Center team will go a long way toward making sure your best pal feels and looks its best all year long.

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When a Kiss Won’t Cut it: A Spotlight on Pet Pain Management

Pet pain management is key to your pet living a long lifeWhen it comes to pet pain management, veterinary medicine has made tremendous strides in the past century. It’s now common knowledge that pets feel pain in much the same way as humans and that chronic pain can impair the healing process by interfering with immune function, decreasing appetite, and increasing anxiety.

At Lone Tree Veterinary Medical Center, improving the quality and longevity of our patients’ lives is one of our top priorities. Let’s take a moment to focus on a pet’s pain and the various ways we can help manage it.

Assessing Pet Pain

Identifying a pet’s pain is the first step towards treatment. Most animals will hide signs of pain and discomfort because this would convey weakness and vulnerability. Consequently, knowing when a pet is hurting is not always easy.

Interestingly, there are different types of pain and different types of causes. Since pain is a sensory response to a painful stimulus, there are often situations where the source of a pet’s pain is not obvious, as it would be if the pet had a visible wound or injury.    Continue…

New Year, New Pet Wellness Resolutions!

It’s hard to believe another year has come and gone, but here we are in 2018! Facing a brand new year is both exciting and daunting, offering us the possibility of starting over in many areas of our lives, such as health and wellness and work habits.

Along with upgrading our personal lifestyles, pet wellness can and should be on the forefront of our New Year’s resolutions. Our list of ideas are designed to be simple and effective ways to give your pet a healthy boost in 2018!

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Fancy Feet: The Importance of Pet Nail Trimming

Have you been hearing the telltale click of Fido’s nails on your kitchen floor lately? Has Whiskers taken to shredding the corner of the leather sofa again? If so, it may be time to trim your pet’s nails.

For many pets and their owners, pet nail trimming can be a task that invokes fear and dread. Your friends at Lone Tree Veterinary Medical Center understand your apprehension and want to help you get started on this important health and wellness task.

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Question of the Day: Why Do Some People Look like Their Pets?

We’ve all seen the funny memes about pet owners and their four-legged best pals who so closely resemble each other, that it’s hard to ignore the reality of it. Spend enough time in dog parks and you’ll start to see it for yourself; the woman whose hairstyle matches her poodle’s fluffy fur, or the man whose thin face and narrow nose are eerily reminiscent of his purebred greyhound’s features.

Since every pet owner knows that his or her pet is the cutest one in the world, it’s certainly not an insult to consider that we may resemble our best pals somewhat. As it turns out, there is actual science behind why some people look like their pets.

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Beware of the Scoot: All You Ever Wanted to Know about Anal Sacs in Pets

chow-chow puppyYou probably weren’t thrilled when your pet did the “Boot Scootin’ Boogie” across the carpet, just as you were serving the main course to your boss who happened to be over for dinner that evening. Your pet’s timely scoot is more than just an embarrassing situation, however, and may be an indication that he or she is having anal sac issues.

Anal sacs in pets are an important part of the anatomy, and must be functioning for your pet’s comfort and safety. Even if your pet has never had issues in this particular area, knowing how to care for the anal sacs is an important component of responsible pet ownership.

What Are Anal Sacs in Pets?

Anal sacs, also sometimes called anal glands, are two small, bag-like structures located just inside the rectum in both dogs and cats. These little pockets are lined with glands that produce a strongly scented fluid. Normally, as a dog or cat defecates, the fluid contained inside the sacs is transferred to the stool.

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Oh Sugar, Sugar: Diabetes in Pets

Pug dogDiabetes is one of the leading causes of death among people in the United States, and our pets aren’t far behind in falling victim to this disease. Studies show that diabetes now affects a whopping 1 in 50 dogs and cats, and doesn’t show any signs of slowing down.

Because diabetes in pets is more common than most people realize, combating this disease requires education and diligence on the part of responsible pet owners. Continue…

An Ounce Of Prevention: The Importance Of Pet Wellness Exams

A portrait of an adorable cat on the examination table

 

 

 

 

As animal owners, we are intimately familiar with our pet’s habits, likes, and dislikes. But how are we to know when our pet’s joints are beginning to feel the effects of arthritis, or if his or her liver isn’t functioning at its peak? This is where the wellness exam comes in.

Your pet’s regularly scheduled wellness visits are about so much more than just another round of shots (although that’s important too!). Every time we see your pet we have the opportunity to get to know him or her better, to catch any problems that may be brewing, and to answer your questions regarding your pet’s health. Continue…