Pet Safety During Fire Season

Pet safety during fire season can affect your pet fire evacuation plan.In the greater Denver area and across Colorado and the West, wildfires are a serious concern, especially during a dry year. While it’s easy to understand the danger wildfires pose to people, homes and property, have you ever considered how wildfires affect our pets? The team at Lone Tree Veterinary Medical Center is here with tips for pet safety during the wildfire season!

Wildfire Evacuations

Suffice it to say that evacuations don’t always occur at a time that’s convenient for us. That’s why it’s important to plan ahead and know how to care for your pet should the need arise. Continue…

The New Lone Tree Vet App: Care at Your Fingertips

The New Lone Tree Vet AppDid you know that we now have our very own App? At Lone Tree Veterinary Medical Center, we recognize that the benefits of smartphone technology are far reaching for our patients and their families, and it’s our pleasure to bring this service to your fingertips. We are excited to announce the launch of our new Lone Tree Vet App, available free of cost, for both android and iPhone! You can download our new App by searching Lone Tree Vet in your App store or by simply following the links above.

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Stay Cool!  Avoiding Hyperthermia in Pets

hyperthermiaAs the summer progresses and temperatures continue to rise, it’s important for pet owners to take their pets’ well-being into consideration when it comes to heat-related dangers. Warm weather doesn’t mean we can’t have some fun in the sun with our pets; rather, it means that we need to be aware of the risks and plan ahead for their safety and well-being.

Hyperthermia in pets, also known as heat stroke, is one of the biggest warm weather risks facing pets in the summertime. Unlike humans, who can sweat through their skin, a pet’s only means for cooling their bodies is through oral panting and the small amount of sweat released through their paws. Knowing how to prevent  hyperthermia in our pets is the first step toward making sure our furry loved ones stay cool and safe all summer long.

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The Heat Is On: Learning to Spot and Prevent Dehydration in Pets

pet dehydrationIt’s no secret that water is vital to the existence of humans and animals, as well as  most other living creatures. Water makes up about 70-80% of a pet’s total body mass and is critical for the proper functioning of each and every cell and system.

Even a small loss of a pet’s fluids can disrupt the body’s delicate balance and result in dehydration. If not corrected, dehydration will impair the body’s functioning and quickly become a medical emergency.

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To the Rescue: Putting Together a Pet First Aid Kit

Our pets depend on us for pretty much everything, and most pet owners pride themselves on being able to provide what their pets need, as well as much of what they want. Many of us fall short, however,  when it comes to planning for the unexpected, and this includes being prepared should your pet ever become injured.

At Lone Tree Veterinary Medical Center, we believe that having a well-stocked pet first aid kit, and knowing how to use it, is an essential part of emergency preparedness for any pet owner.

Creating a Pet First Aid Kit

We recommend that pet owners carry a pet first aid kit in their car and also keep one in an easily accessible location in the home. Pet first aid kits can be purchased ready-made from pet supply stores or online (here’s one we like) or you can make your own from scratch.

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My Pet Ate What? GI Obstruction in Pets

Sad Basset Hound waiting at the DoorEvery pet owner knows how much pets enjoy food. Unfortunately, sometimes this love of chewing and swallowing can get our pets into trouble, particularly when they ingest something inedible causing a GI obstruction.

In many cases, something a dog or cat ate will pass through the digestive tract with little to no trouble, but this is not always true. Any object can become lodged in a pet’s gastrointestinal (GI) tract (esophagus, stomach, or intestine), creating problems at any point along the way, including, the destruction of the area of the intestines where the foreign material is lodged. Continue…

Rabies and Pets: Know the Enemy

French BulldogMost people know that wild animals can carry rabies, but many of us don’t think it’s something that can affect our pets or us. Unfortunately, the reality of rabies is closer to home than many of us realize. The disease is present in every state (except Hawaii) and kills hundreds of pets, as well as a few humans, each year.

Understanding the link between rabies and pets is key in protecting your family, both two-legged and four, from this devastating illness. Continue…

Do You Hear What I Hear? Rattlesnake Safety For Pets

Rattle snake poisedRattlesnakes are a fact of life around these parts. Most of us are aware of the dangers these reptiles pose to us as we hike and camp, or even while we putter around in our own backyards. Rattlesnakes and pets are a particularly disastrous combination, thanks to our pets’ curious nature and unpredictability.

Do you know what to do if you and your pet happen across a rattlesnake? Learning about rattlesnake safety for pets is key to protecting your furry loved one.

Rattlesnakes And Pets

A rattlesnake bite poses a serious risk to your pet. Once the venom is injected, it begins to act immediately. The blood vessels near the region of the bite are compromised, and an immune response causes severe swelling and pain. Because the venom also affects the blood’s ability to clot, large amounts of blood may be lost. The effects of the venom will lead to shock, and eventually death, if left untreated. Continue…

When Is It A Pet Emergency?

2 golden retriever puppy with a red phone and a stethoscopeIt’s late, but your pet is acting strangely. You’re concerned about your pet’s symptoms, but aren’t sure if it’s worth a trip to the veterinarian this late, or if it can wait until normal business hours the next day… What would you do?

Some emergencies, such as seizures or automobile accidents, are obvious. But pets are genetically wired to hide pain and illness, which can make it difficult for even the most conscientious pet owner to know when their dog or cat is in need of immediate medical attention. Learning how to recognize the signs of a pet emergency could make all the difference for your pet. Continue…